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Saturday, September 3, 2022

Artemis I Launch Coverage; Attempt #2







If all goes well, NASA will be launching the Artemis 1 unmanned mission today sometime between 2:17 and 4:17pm Eastern Time. There is a two-hour window for the launch attempt today. If the rocket does not launch today, the next launch window will begin at 5:12pm Tuesday, September 6th.

Artemis 1 will last for six weeks and will test all the rocket stages and spacecraft that would be used in later Artemis missions. After reaching orbit and performing a trans-lunar injection (burn to the Moon), the mission will deploy ten CubeSat satellites and the Orion spacecraft will enter a distant retrograde orbit for six days. The Orion spacecraft will then return and reenter the Earth's atmosphere, protected by its heat shield, and splash down in the Pacific Ocean.

The original launch date of Artemis 1 was planned in December 2016, but it was delayed at least sixteen times due to technical issues with the SLS and the Orion spacecraft. Other factors contributing to the delays are the cost overruns and budget limits imposed by the federal government. After the Artemis 1 mission, Artemis 2 will perform a crewed lunar flyby and Artemis 3 will perform a crewed lunar landing, five decades after the last Apollo mission.


Live video feeds from NASA, NASA Spaceflight, and Everyday Astronaut have been embedded below, along with some information from the NASA Press Packet and explainer videos about this mission from various sources. For more detailed information about this mission, download a PDF of the Artemis 1 Reference Guide from the NASA website.


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NASA VIDEO (starts at 12:15pm)



NASA Spaceflight



Everyday Astronaut



Mission Overview

Artemis I is the first integrated test of NASA’s deep space exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and the ground systems at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The first in a series of increasingly complex missions, Artemis I is an uncrewed flight test that will provide a foundation for human deep space exploration and demonstrate our commitment and capability to return humans to the Moon and extend beyond.



Artemis I is the first integrated test of NASA’s deep space exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and the ground systems at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The first in a series of increasingly complex missions, Artemis I is an uncrewed flight test that will provide a foundation for human deep space exploration and demonstrate our commitment and capability to return humans to the Moon and extend beyond.

Launch site: Launch Pad 39B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida
Launch date: Sept. 3, 2022
Launch window: 2:17 p.m. EDT to 4:17 p.m.
Mission Duration: 37 days, 23 hours, 53 minutes
Destination: distant retrograde orbit around the Moon
Total mission miles: approximately 1.3 million miles (2.1 million kilometers)
Targeted splashdown site: Pacific Ocean, off the coast of San Diego
Return speed: Up to 25,000 mph (40,000 kph)
Splashdown: October 11, 2022
During this flight, Orion will launch atop the most powerful rocket in the world and fly farther than any spacecraft built for humans has ever flown. Over the course of the mission, it will travel 280,000 miles (450,000 kilometers) from Earth and 40,000 miles (64,000 kilometers) beyond the far side of the Moon. Orion will stay in space longer than any human spacecraft has without docking to a space station and return home faster and hotter than ever before.

This first Artemis mission will demonstrate the performance of both Orion and the SLS rocket and test our capabilities to orbit the Moon and return to Earth. The flight will pave the way for future missions to the lunar vicinity, including landing the first woman and first person of color on the surface of the Moon.

With Artemis I, NASA sets the stage for human exploration into deep space, where astronauts will build and begin testing the systems near the Moon needed for lunar surface missions and exploration to other destinations farther from Earth, including Mars. With Artemis, NASA will collaborate with industry and international partners to establish long-term exploration for the first time.



The first attempt of Artemis 1 on August 29th had to be scrubbed due to an engine leak.

This first Artemis mission will demonstrate the performance of both Orion and the SLS rocket and test our capabilities to orbit the Moon and return to Earth. The flight will pave the way for future missions to the lunar vicinity, including landing the first woman and first person of color on the surface of the Moon.

With Artemis I, NASA sets the stage for human exploration into deep space, where astronauts will build and begin testing the systems near the Moon needed for lunar surface missions and exploration to other destinations farther from Earth, including Mars. With Artemis, NASA will collaborate with industry and international partners to establish long-term exploration for the first time.


Explainer Videos What's The Big Deal About Artemis - NASA's New Massive Moon Rocket | Scott Manley



The Full Plan For Artemis Part 1: The Robotic Missions | Answers With Joe



Artemis I: We Are Ready | NASA




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Published at 10:30am on Saturday, September 03, 2022
Author: Bobby Coggins, using material provided in the NASA Artemis I Press Kit.


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